Work Clean. Play Dirty.
by @JetsetFarryn
fastcompany:

Apple Introduces “5K” Retina iMac With 14.7 Million Pixels
The iMac didn’t really get its due at Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference this summer. With all the fanfare focused on software, Apple rolled out incremental changes and price cuts for its iMac line. On Thursday, the company pulled the focus back to its desktop computers, showing off new iMacs with high-resolution “5K” displays and updating the oft-overlooked Mac Mini with faster processor and graphics.
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fastcompany:

Apple Introduces “5K” Retina iMac With 14.7 Million Pixels

The iMac didn’t really get its due at Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference this summer. With all the fanfare focused on software, Apple rolled out incremental changes and price cuts for its iMac line. On Thursday, the company pulled the focus back to its desktop computers, showing off new iMacs with high-resolution “5K” displays and updating the oft-overlooked Mac Mini with faster processor and graphics.

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fastcompany:

Continuing Facebook's multi-app strategy, Instagram on Tuesday debuted a standalone app that turns video recordings into sped-up timelapses.
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fastcompany:

Continuing Facebook's multi-app strategy, Instagram on Tuesday debuted a standalone app that turns video recordings into sped-up timelapses.

Read More>

fastcompany:

At today’s Google I/O keynote, Google revealed its plan to redesign itself from the ground up.
Google took to the stage in San Francisco to roll out most of its big plans for the year. Some were great, others less so. But between the Android update, its burgeoning smartwatch platform and its never-ending quest to conquer your living room, there was plenty to chew on. Here’s the best (and the rest), of Google I/O 2014.
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fastcompany:

At today’s Google I/O keynote, Google revealed its plan to redesign itself from the ground up.

Google took to the stage in San Francisco to roll out most of its big plans for the year. Some were great, others less so. But between the Android update, its burgeoning smartwatch platform and its never-ending quest to conquer your living room, there was plenty to chew on. Here’s the best (and the rest), of Google I/O 2014.

Read More>

fastcompany:

Please remember to turn off your computer brain before boarding the airplane.
Aside from the addition of a whole lot more screens, daily life for most people doesn’t look much different than it did 10 or 15 years ago. But if scientists and eager startups are to be believed, the next few decades will be busting at the seams with dramatic, sci-fi inspired innovations, like synthetic meat, drone technology, and autonomous cars.
If these technologies pan out, the world will not only look very different, it will have to operate differently too. In a Tumblr called Signs from the Near Future ( signsfromthenearfuture ), designer Fernando Barbella explores what signage will look like when we have to absorb all of these innovations into human culture—perhaps there will be advertising discounts on test-tube burgers, or airport warnings for travelers who may have forgotten to turn off their computer brains.
Read More>

fastcompany:

Please remember to turn off your computer brain before boarding the airplane.

Aside from the addition of a whole lot more screens, daily life for most people doesn’t look much different than it did 10 or 15 years ago. But if scientists and eager startups are to be believed, the next few decades will be busting at the seams with dramatic, sci-fi inspired innovations, like synthetic meat, drone technology, and autonomous cars.

If these technologies pan out, the world will not only look very different, it will have to operate differently too. In a Tumblr called Signs from the Near Future ( signsfromthenearfuture ), designer Fernando Barbella explores what signage will look like when we have to absorb all of these innovations into human culture—perhaps there will be advertising discounts on test-tube burgers, or airport warnings for travelers who may have forgotten to turn off their computer brains.

Read More>

“The no set work hours and unlimited vacation are just a small part of a much bigger idea.”

While hiring someone you just met and then telling them they have no set hours and can take a vacation tomorrow, if they so choose, may sound a little crazy to most employers, CEO Sam Decker believes other companies should look into the practice because he says Freesponsibility isn’t simply built on a foundation of blind trust, it’s built on a psychological and social phenomenon called the Pygmalion Effect.

“The Pygmalion Effect says that the more trust you put in someone, the more they will fulfill that trust.”

More> Weird Hiring Tactics That “Just Work” From Three Killer Startups

(via fastcompany)

newsweek:

By the end of the year, there will likely be two giant Army blimps hovering 10,000 feet above Baltimore with the ability to see 340 miles in any direction. Most forms of surveillance have weaknesses: If they’re ground-based, they have range limitations.
Predator drones have to refuel and don’t have the ability to hover in one spot. Helicopters are really loud and generally have to fly pretty low. That’s where JLENS comes in.
It’s a giant, 243-foot long blimp that’s tethered to the ground. It has ridiculously powerful radar and cameras. It pretty much doesn’t have to move, and it only has to land once a month or so for quick maintenance. Yes, that means the entire mid-Atlantic region will, at least, have the potential to be under “persistent surveillance,” a dream term for those in the intelligence biz and a worst-case scenario for those who care a lick about privacy.
One aerostat that was tested in Utah last year was able to follow individual vehicles “dozens of miles away” and watch a test subject plant a fake bomb on the side of the road. According to the Washington Post, the Army has “no current plans” to use that high-powered video sensor in Maryland, but wouldn’t rule out using it in the future.
(via A Giant Military Surveillance Blimp Is Going to Constantly Monitor the East Coast)

newsweek:

By the end of the year, there will likely be two giant Army blimps hovering 10,000 feet above Baltimore with the ability to see 340 miles in any direction. Most forms of surveillance have weaknesses: If they’re ground-based, they have range limitations.

Predator drones have to refuel and don’t have the ability to hover in one spot. Helicopters are really loud and generally have to fly pretty low. That’s where JLENS comes in.

It’s a giant, 243-foot long blimp that’s tethered to the ground. It has ridiculously powerful radar and cameras. It pretty much doesn’t have to move, and it only has to land once a month or so for quick maintenance. Yes, that means the entire mid-Atlantic region will, at least, have the potential to be under “persistent surveillance,” a dream term for those in the intelligence biz and a worst-case scenario for those who care a lick about privacy.

One aerostat that was tested in Utah last year was able to follow individual vehicles “dozens of miles away” and watch a test subject plant a fake bomb on the side of the road. According to the Washington Post, the Army has “no current plans” to use that high-powered video sensor in Maryland, but wouldn’t rule out using it in the future.

(via A Giant Military Surveillance Blimp Is Going to Constantly Monitor the East Coast)

matadornetwork:

6 reasons planning a trip is (almost) better than going on one
1. Everything is possible. 
Up until the moment you click “buy” on those airplane tickets, you could go anywhere. Sure you have a budget and places you want to go, but still, for one brief second you can pretend you’re living the life of the super wealthy, that you can jet off to Rome for dinner and Iceland for a mud bath. Planning a trip is about dreaming and, the wilder the dreams, the better. In that first stage of planning you don’t have to be practical. You can think crazy: I’m going to New Zealand so obviously I should see Australia too, because they’re so close, amirite?!? Sure, at some point you’ll have to whittle it down and count your pennies, but not yet.
Keep reading

matadornetwork:

6 reasons planning a trip is (almost) better than going on one

1. Everything is possible.

Up until the moment you click “buy” on those airplane tickets, you could go anywhere. Sure you have a budget and places you want to go, but still, for one brief second you can pretend you’re living the life of the super wealthy, that you can jet off to Rome for dinner and Iceland for a mud bath. Planning a trip is about dreaming and, the wilder the dreams, the better. In that first stage of planning you don’t have to be practical. You can think crazy: I’m going to New Zealand so obviously I should see Australia too, because they’re so close, amirite?!? Sure, at some point you’ll have to whittle it down and count your pennies, but not yet.

Keep reading